We Provide Answers to Your VA Disability Benefits Questions Here

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  • Can I get VA disability for scleritis?

    VA Disability for ScleritisWhile on active duty, military personnel face dangerous situations that not only put their lives at risk but their future health as well. Although many soldiers survive combat, they may still face serious medical conditions after they return home. These service-connected conditions can include cancers caused by direct exposure to radiation or a lost limb due to an improvised explosive device (IED). Service-connected illnesses, diseases, and medical problems qualify for disability benefits from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA); however, you must show proof that your medical condition was caused by an event or incident that took place during active duty, or it was aggravated or worsened by the event.

    Sometimes the link between the event and your injury is easy to prove, but it’s possible that your disability is a secondary medical condition that occurs later. This may be the case with such conditions as hypertension, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and some eye disorders, including scleritis—a disease that can cause blindness if not treated.

    Understanding Scleritis

    The white part of the eye is called the sclera. It is a layer of tough, fibrous tissue that protects the eye and gives it its shape. Scleritis is diagnosed when the sclera is swollen and inflamed. Most often, people suffer scleritis due to an autoimmune disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus; however, scleritis can also be infectious, and service personnel can contract it from co-workers with whom they share equipment or spend time. It’s also possible for scleritis to be caused by a fungus or parasite or an injury to your eye.

    For example, if during service you were treated for an injury after battery acid splashed into your eye, you may be later diagnosed with conjunctival scarring and/or scleritis in that eye. Or, if you suffered a trauma to the head, it’s possible to be diagnosed with scleritis. The effects of an IED or a bomb can be delayed and cause symptoms much later—sometimes months after the incident occurs. After service, soldiers may return to their normal lives, not realizing that a head or eye injury has caused vision trauma.

    Symptoms

    There are two main types of scleritis: anterior and posterior.

    • Anterior. If the anterior is affected, there is inflammation to the front of your sclera. This type of scleritis is the most common.
    • Posterior. If the posterior is affected, there is inflammation to the back of your sclera. This type of scleritis is not as common but can lead to glaucoma or other severe eye problems.

    Typically, scleritis comes on slowly, so a veteran won’t suddenly “get” this eye disorder. There are signs and symptoms that develop gradually, including:

    • Eye ache. This is the most common symptom that can be felt in your jaw or near your brow. Eye movements often will make the pain worse, and the eyeball can be sensitive to the touch.
    • Redness. The white of your eye may appear severely inflamed and red.
    • Sensitivity to light. You may find that your eyes are more sensitive to light—also known as photophobia.
    • Blurry vision. You may find that your vision is blurred and/or notice that you have unexplained tears.

    The primary symptoms of scleritis are pain and redness in the sclera, and this redness can become a deep purple color. Often, patients feel pain radiating from the eye to other areas of the face and head, and they may lose some vision.

    Obtaining VA Disability for Scleritis: What Benefits Can You Get?

    VA disability for scleritits, and eye disorders in general, are rated by the VA based on the number of “incapacitating episodes” and required treatments a veteran has during a 12-month period. They use the 38 CFR § 4.79 rating schedule, as well as the following rating formula:

    • 60% rating. You must have “documented incapacitating episodes requiring seven or more treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months.”
    • 40% rating. You must have “documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least five but less than seven treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months.”
    • 20% rating. You must have “documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least three but less than five treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months.”
    • 10% rating. You must have “documented incapacitating episodes requiring at least one but less than three treatment visits for an eye condition during the past 12 months.”

    Contact Cuddigan Law for Help Getting VA Disability for Scleritis

    If you suffer from a service-connected eye injury or condition, you may qualify for disability benefits. Let Cuddigan Law assist you in determining if you’re eligible. Our attorneys have been supporting veterans for years, and we will help you document your eye injury or eye disorder and work with your treating medical providers to describe the full extent of your limitations. We know exactly how much these disability benefits mean to you. If we accept your case, we will take all steps within the law to help you get them. If an eye injury you received during military service is making it impossible for you to work, contact Cuddigan Law to speak with an intake specialist for free.

  • What should I do to prepare for my C&P exam for eyes?

    A common but less reported combat injury from both the Afghanistan and Iraq wars is eye trauma. Often, eye injuries occur because of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or any type of detonating mechanism. From 2001 to 2011, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) saw over 97,500 new veteran eye injuries related to military service in their VA health system—approximately 9,000 were retinal injuries, over 4,800 were burn injuries, and over 1,200 were optic nerve injuries.

    If you suffered a service-connected eye injury or have a secondary eye condition or disease that resulted from your time in the military and are seeking disability benefits from the VA, you’ll likely need to first complete a Compensation & Pension (C&P) exam. This is a medical exam ordered by the VA to evaluate the severity of your eye condition and help determine a VA rating

    VA disability C&P exam for eyesWhy a C&P Exam Is Required?

    Although many veterans who file a claim for VA disability benefits may be required to complete a C&P exam for eyes, not all will need to take one. If you and your doctor have supplied enough evidence in your medical record to prove your disability, the VA may not ask you to take this exam. However, if there is missing or incomplete information, the C&P exam for eyes will help fill in gaps to ensure that there’s enough evidence for your claim to be processed. In general, the VA might require you to have a C&P exam for one of the following reasons:

    • Your medical evaluation was performed by an independent doctor.
    • The VA needs to diagnose or confirm that you have a disability.
    • The VA needs to establish a timeframe for the onset of your symptoms.
    • The VA wants to determine the severity of your symptoms.
    • The VA wants to determine if you are being honest about your disability.

    What Happens at a C&P Exam for Eyes?

    The C&P exam is not like a physical or exam with your regular doctor. No treatment or medication will be prescribed by the examiner, and the appointment may be much shorter. At the C&P exam, the examiner will review your medical records and ask you questions about what’s in your file, as well as:

    • Ask you direct questions about your health and symptoms
    • Observe your behavior, attitude, and demeanor as they relate to your disability
    • Perform a partial, less extensive physical exam

    How to Prepare for a C&P Eye Exam

    Once you’ve been scheduled for a C&P exam, there are some important steps to take to prepare for the exam to help ensure you receive all the compensation you deserve. These steps include:

    • Document your symptoms in a daily journal. You should describe all the pain you feel, the symptoms you experience, and how the injury impacts your life. For example, if your eye injury has made it difficult for you to drive or you experience blurry vision that interferes with your ability to work, you should record these in detail. Be sure to bring this information to your exam.
    • Ask a spouse or a close friend to accompany you. It’s helpful to have a person who knows you well attend the exam. Because they witness the difficulty you face, they can provide clarity about your situation, add details about what you deal with because of your eye injury, and discuss the daily suffering you experience. You will likely need the examiner’s approval to allow this person to be with you during the exam.
    • Bring new documents or updated medical evidence. If you have new documents, updated medical test results, or other reports you haven’t yet sent to the VA, it’s important to bring them with you. Because they likely won’t be in your claims folder, having copies of them can help your disability claim.
    • Prepare for the questions you may be asked. During the exam, the objective is to ensure that the examiner understands the full extent of your eye condition. Because you want to detail all your symptoms and explain how they impact your life, consider bringing a copy of your disability benefits questionnaire (DBQ) to the exam. The DBQ can be used as a guide to help you remember details and aspects of your condition that may not immediately come to mind during the exam. 

    Call Our VA Disability Lawyers for Service-Connected Eye Conditions

    If you suffer from a service-connected eye injury or believe yours is a secondary eye condition brought on by a service-connected disease or illness, you may qualify for disability benefits. Let our VA disability lawyers assist you in determining if you’re eligible. Our VA disability lawyers have been supporting veterans for years, and we will help you document your eye injury or eye disorder and work with your treating medical providers to describe the full extent of your limitations. We know exactly how much these disability benefits mean to you. If we accept your case, we will take all steps within the law to help you get them. If your eye injury is making it impossible for you to work, contact our VA disability law firm to speak with an intake specialist for free.

  • How will the VA rate my eye injury?

    how will the VA rate my eye injury

    In the fourth quarter of 2018, the military reported nearly 3,000 eye injuries. According to a Military Medicine article cited in ProQuest, military personnel are especially vulnerable to eye injuries due to changes in combat warfare, and there has been an increase in eye injuries compared to injuries to other body parts. This increase was caused by improved battlefield weaponry and advances in technology. Many eye injuries were a result of projectile and blast fragments.

    If you’re a veteran and can connect your eye injury to your military service, you may qualify for disability benefits from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Having an experienced VA disability benefits lawyer help with your claim will increase your chances of obtaining fair compensation.

    How Will the VA Rate My Eye Injury?

    The VA rates eye conditions using the VA Schedule of Ratings Disabilities under Section 4.79 and uses the following three primary measurements:

    Central Visual Acuity

    Central visual acuity is the eye’s ability to discern details and shapes of objects at certain distances. The VA wants to know how blurry or focused an object is when you look at it from different ranges. A doctor tests for central visual acuity by performing a basic eye chart exam and may use the terms near-sighted or far-sighted to characterize a veteran’s central visual acuity. The doctor will assign a rating based on the veteran’s corrected vision—how much better their vision is with glasses or contacts. It’s important to note that the VA rates both eyes together, so a veteran receives a combined rating even if both eyes are impaired. 

    Visual Field

    Testing a patient’s visual field tells the doctor how much a veteran can see when looking at a fixed point. It tests the range of vision a veteran has without moving the eye. A normal visual field equals 500 degrees, and a disability rating will be given for vision loss if their visual field doesn’t match the required measurements.

    Muscle Dysfunction

    Testing for muscle dysfunction tells the doctor how well or poorly the eye moves. Using another type of visual chart divided into four quadrants, the doctor measures for a decrease in muscle function. Even if muscle dysfunction exists in both eyes, the VA will only give one disability rating.

    You May Qualify for VA Eye Disability

    As a VA disability benefits lawyer at Cuddigan Law, we have been supporting veterans for years, and we can help you if you need VA disability benefits due to a service-connected eye condition. Call us today to speak to an intake specialist for free.

  • When is alcoholism a VA disability?

    Many veterans believe they can’t service-connect alcoholism or drug abuse to receive disability benefits from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). However, that’s a common myth. The critical component for this type of disability claim is whether a veteran’s alcoholism, also referred to as alcohol use disorder (AUD), is related to a secondary illness or condition that can be service-connected to time spent in the military.

    While it’s true that the VA refuses to consider some disorders as service-connected—those that clearly aren't related to a veteran’s time in the military—if the veteran can prove that his AUD disability is secondary to a service-connected disorder or aggravated by one, it’s possible for the veteran to receive compensation for it.

    When Is Alcoholism a Disability?

    When is alcoholism a disability worthy of VA benefits?The VA recognizes alcoholism as a disability when it can be service-connected to other conditions that developed during time spent in the military.

    For example, if a veteran developed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) while in service, and he abuses alcohol to self-medicate as a way to cope with his PTSD, he may be eligible for VA disability benefits.

    Additionally, if the veteran had a history of AUD prior to service and can prove that his condition was “aggravated” by another service-connected health issue, he may also qualify.

    However, making this connection isn’t easy, and it’s important that an individual has all the necessary evidence, including lay statements and a medical opinion, to support the claim. The VA may not recognize your claim if you’ve abused alcohol out of habit, out of a need to be social, or as a way to de-stress. These actions can be viewed as “willful misconduct”—a reckless disregard of the probable consequences of engaging in harmful and dangerous behavior. So it’s important to hire a VA disability attorney to help file a convincing and successful claim.  

    Discover the Cuddigan Law Advantage

    Submitting a successful VA disability claim for alcohol use disorder can be a difficult process. A VA determination of willful misconduct can stand in the way of an individual receiving benefits for an acknowledged medical concern.

    At Cuddigan Law, we understand that veterans who suffer from PTSD can face many types of other medical conditions, including alcoholism. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we can help you if you need VA disability benefits following a diagnosis of PTSD or any other health condition. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • What are the signs that a veteran may suffer from alcoholism?

    Heavy alcohol use is firmly rooted in military culture. In many environments, personnel on active duty use alcohol for recreation, to relieve stress, and as a way to socialize and connect with others. However, despite the policies and programs in place to moderate alcohol consumption in the military, alcoholism remains a continuing problem for veterans and service members.

    Signs a Veteran May Be Abusing Alcohol

    Signs of veteran or military personnel alcohol abuse It’s not easy for service members to return stateside after being deployed and resume a normal life. Many veterans develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can lead to alcohol abuse and alcoholism, also diagnosed as alcohol use disorder (AUD). Family members may have concerns about a veteran’s reliance on alcohol but not be sure if there’s a serious problem.

    Here are signs that a veteran or active military member may have AUD:

    • Appears that drinking, being sick, and/or hangovers interfere with a person's job, taking care of family, or other responsibilities
    • Cares more about drinking than spending time pursuing activities they once enjoyed
    • Exhibits withdrawal symptoms when trying to cut back or quit drinking such as anxiety, nausea, sweating, insomnia, and shaking
    • Puts themselves in dangerous situations while drinking
    • Attempts to stop drinking or cut back but is unsuccessful
    • Appears paranoid, fearful, and/or nervous
    • Acts in a secretive way
    • Continues to drink even after harming relationships
    • Exhibits a change in sleeping and eating habits
    • Has unexpected mood changes, erratic behavior, and/or angry outbursts
    • Lacks motivation or enthusiasm but can appear unusually happy and energetic at times
    • Stops taking care of appearance and hygiene
    • Shows a significant decrease or increase in weight
    • Smells of alcohol on a regular basis
    • Slurs speech and appears to have poor motor coordination
    • Lacks an ability to maintain responsibilities at work, at home, or with friends and family

    Our Nebraska-Based VA Disability Lawyers Help Veterans Nationwide Get The Disability Benefits They Deserve

    At Cuddigan Law, we understand that veterans may have problems with alcohol after developing PTSD. We also know that PTSD is a debilitating mental condition that can severely and negatively impact your life. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on how best to move forward. If you’d like a free evaluation of your disability case, call Cuddigan Law, and speak to an intake specialist for free.

  • Can the VA take control of my finances if I have a mental illness?

    It’s possible that a veteran can be found mentally incompetent if he has a mental disability, is of advanced age, or is physically frail or weak. For the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to determine that an individual is incompetent, there must be medical evidence to support this or a court ruling.

    If you’re found to be incompetent and unable to handle your financial affairs, the VA may appoint someone to serve as a VA fiduciary under its Veterans Fiduciary Program. This person is similar to a guardian or representative of someone’s estate.

    Responsibilities of a Fiduciary

    Can the VA take control over a vet's benefits?​It’s important to understand the role of a fiduciary and the limitations of this person’s authority. A fiduciary must use the veteran’s VA benefits for their personal care and/or well-being. The veteran must be provided the same standard of living like any other person with similar finances, and the fiduciary must be sure the veteran receives the appropriate medical and mental health care.

    It’s also important to understand the following limitations of the fiduciary:

    • The individual isn't appointed by the court.
    • They have the authority only over the benefits a veteran receives from the VA. Sometimes, this authority extends to managing all of the veteran’s financial affairs if their VA benefits are combined with other funds.
    • The VA—and not the court—has oversight for this arrangement.

    How the VA Determines Incompetence

    Most often, the VA relies on the results of the veteran’s Compensation and Pension (C&P) Exam to determine if he’s incompetent. The C&P exam is a standard assessment taken after you apply for disability.

    In this report, a doctor provides a medical opinion about your disability and whether it’s service-connected, as well as information about your mental ability to handle money. Additionally, the VA may also look at the results of your regular doctor visits to determine your ability to handle VA benefits. Usually, it’s the C&P examiner who brings up the issue of incompetence—often during an exam where a veteran is looking for an increase in his rating for a mental condition.

    While it’s usually up to the VA rater who reviews the case to make the determination of incompetence, the rater most often agrees with the opinion of the examiner.

    Contact Our Experienced VA Disability Lawyers For A Consultaiton Today

    The experienced VA Disability Lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country. They understand that PTSD or any mental illness is a debilitating condition that can severely and negatively impact a veteran’s life.

    If your C&P exam results indicate mental incompetence, or you’d like a free evaluation of your disability case, call Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys will answer your questions and ensure that you have accurate information about your rights as they relate to your mental health diagnosis. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise on your rights. Contact us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • How does the VA Evaluate My PTSD Using a PLC-5 form?

    If you’re a veteran seeking financial assistance from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for PTSD, you’ll need to fill out a PCL-5 form. It helps assess the existence and severity of PTSD symptoms, and you’ll likely be given it prior to your Compensation and Pension (C&P) exam. There are three versions of this form—the PCL-M is for military personnel—and you’ll answer questions about “stressful military experiences.”

    Filling out a PCL-5 form for PTSD evaluation

    Using the PLC-M for Your Evaluation

    When you arrive for your C&P exam for PTSD, you'll probably be given the PLC-5 (PCL-M) paper exam. This exam is a PTSD checklist that has approximately 20 questions. It’s used as a self-screening tool—or self-reporting tool—to assist in diagnosing PTSD.

    The PCL-5 helps to:

    • Monitor the changes in symptoms during and after a patient is treated
    • Screen patients for PTSD
    • Make a provisional (temporary) diagnosis of PTSD

    The PCL-5 can be completed in about 5–10 minutes and is usually filled out in the waiting room. Veterans are asked to rate certain symptoms over the last month using the following 0–4 scale:

    • 0 = Not at all
    • 1 = A little bit
    • 2 Moderately
    • 3 Quite a bit
    • 4 Extremely

    Using these scores, the C&P examiner can make a “provisional diagnosis” of PTSD. For a veteran to have a probable diagnosis of PTSD, he must have given a "2 or higher rating in each of the four symptoms groups." Also, if the veteran scored 38 or higher after answering all questions, it’s probable that he has PTSD.

    Our Experienced VA Disability Lawyers Can Help You With Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced VA disability lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans made to protect this country. They understand that PTSD is a debilitating mental condition that can severely and negatively impact a veteran’s life.

    If you need help with your upcoming C&P exam or service-connecting your PTSD and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

  • What are the symptoms of hypervigilance?

    Veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after witnessing or being involved in a traumatic incident during service may experience hypervigilance as a symptom of this mental condition. Hypervigilance causes a veteran to feel on “high alert” for dangers or threats they believe are real but often are not. When they have this heightened sense of arousal, a veteran can feel anxiety, have fight or flight responses, and feel they're in jeopardy. 

    Symptoms of Hypervigilance

    When an individual has feelings of hypervigilance, they might experience the following physical, behavioral, emotional, and mental symptoms:

    • Physical. These symptoms most closely resemble anxiety and can include sweating, a rapid heart rate, and shallow, quick breathing. Over an extended period of time, a veteran who remains in this constant state of readiness can be overcome with exhaustion.
    • Behavioral. These symptoms of hypervigilance include quick, automatic, knee-jerk type reactions. A person may have nervous, jittery reflexes and overreact to loud noises. Additionally, they might misperceive a comment from a friend or coworker, believing it was rude or inconsiderate. And because their immediate instinct is to defend themselves, they may respond violently or with hostility.
    • Emotional. Various emotional symptoms of hypervigilance can be extreme and harsh. Veterans often feel fear, panic, and constant worry, as well as concern that they’re being judged by others. Sometimes, they withdraw emotionally, experience mood swings, or have sudden outbursts of emotion that don’t fit the situation.
    • Mental. In general, the “processing protocol” is broken in the brain of someone who suffers from PTSD. Paranoia is a primary mental symptom of hypervigilance, along with excessive rationalizations of actions that aren’t logical or reasonable.

    Symptoms of hypervigilanceThere are long-term symptoms of hypervigilance as well.

    If someone is in a constant state of “alertness,” they may develop certain behaviors to quiet or oppose what they perceive are threats. If they believe they're in danger of assault, they might decide to carry a concealed weapon. If they suffer from social anxiety, they may use daydreaming to resist participating in conversations.

    Call Cuddigan Law for Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced veterans disability lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country. They understand that combat isn't easy, and veterans can suffer from physical injuries, as well as psychological traumas, including PTSD and the many symptoms that go with it, such as hypervigilance.

    If you’re a veteran suffering from PTSD, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. If you need help service-connecting your mental health condition and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our veterans disability lawyers have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • What do I need to corroborate my stressor event?

    If you’re a veteran who experienced a traumatic event during active duty that caused your post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this “stressor” event must be corroborated if you want disability benefits from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). We explain how you go about this.

    Corroborating an In-Service Stressor

    Corroborating a PTSD service-related stressorThe VA states that a stressor involves being exposed to death or threatened with death, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence. To get a VA disability rating for PTSD, veterans must have: 

    1. A current diagnosis of PTSD by a medical professional
    2. A corroborated in-service stressor
    3. Medical evidence that links the PTSD to the stressor

    If a veteran experienced a stressor that’s not linked with a combat incident for which he was awarded a medal, the VA will require a detailed account of the stressor event. There are various questions an individual will need to answer, but some include:

    • The date the stressor event occurred, within two months
    • The unit designation when the event occurred
    • The names/unit designations of anyone who was killed when the event occurred
    • The facility that treated the wounds suffered in the stressor event
    • The names of others who witnessed the event
    • The types of military equipment damaged or lost in the stressor event

    Answering these questions help the VA corroborate that the event did, in fact, happen. Often, veterans are surprised and offended by the amount and type of information requested by the VA. However, because the stressor event might have occurred years and sometimes decades before the disability claim is filed, the VA needs specific data as it doesn’t have automatic access to every record maintained by the military.

    Call Cuddigan Law for Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced veterans disability lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans made to protect this country. They understand that some individuals may experience stressors that cause PTSD. If you’re a veteran who needs to corroborate your in-service stressor, we can help. We'll also assist you in obtaining the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones.

    Our veterans disability lawyers have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • Is medical treatment for PTSD and traumatic brain injuries different?

    It should be, and here's why: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition, and a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a neurological disorder. Treatment is sometimes complicated because the symptoms for PTSD and a TBI can be similar. For example, patients who suffer from PTSD or a TBI may share symptoms of irritability and fatigue. But despite the overlap in symptoms, the medical treatment for them should be different.

    Treating a traumatic brain injury and how it's different from PTSDTreatment for a TBI

    If a veteran experiences a mild TBI, he's likely to recover without any type of medical treatment. However, for more severe TBIs, some medication may be prescribed, and treatment usually involves rehabilitation to help the patient improve functioning.

    Because a TBI can impact walking, talking, and thinking, a doctor may prescribe the following types of rehab:

    • Physical therapy (PT). In general, PT helps patients reclaim their ability to move, talk, and function, enabling them to enjoy favorite activities and live normal lives. Treatment usually involves exercise, hot/cold therapy, manual therapy, and education for the patient. The goal is to increase a patient’s strength, coordination, and stamina.
    • Language and speech therapy. When a veteran suffers a TBI, he may experience problems with communication and cognition. It may be challenging for him to articulate the point he wants to make, organize thoughts, or understand new information. It’s also possible that a veteran may find it difficult to chew or swallow. Speech therapy helps a patient to express and understand language.​
    • Occupational Therapy. This therapy helps patients regain skills to reach their goals and perform normal, daily activities. Whether someone has cognitive disabilities or is recovering from an injury, an occupational therapist works to treat the whole person so he can engage fully in day-to-day life.

    Treatment for PTSD

    When veterans return home from combat zones where they faced the mental and emotional challenges of war, including life-changing and traumatic events, they can suffer from or later develop PTSD. This recognized medical condition presents symptoms that interfere with a veteran’s ability to live a healthy, productive, and rewarding life. There are numerous treatment methods for military personnel who experience symptoms of PTSD, including:

    • Cognitive Processing Therapy. Many individuals who experienced a traumatic event during war return home to feel they live in a dangerous world. Cognitive processing therapy starts by having a person write an “impact statement” and share it with other veterans to discuss what it’s like to live as if they’re still a prisoner of combat. This begins to help the veteran stop seeing the world as an unsafe place.
    • Prolonged Exposure Therapy. This therapy encourages an individual to gradually address the traumatic or life-altering incident and talk about the memories out loud.
    • Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy. This type of therapy practices relaxation, and also has an individual recall details, re-frame his thoughts about the traumatic event, write a letter about the event, and then conduct a goodbye ceremony to leave the event in the past.

    We Can Help With Your TBI or PTSD Claim

    The experienced veterans disability attorneys at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices all military personnel make to protect this country. We understand that many veterans return home suffering from a medical condition, including PTSD or a TBI, or may develop symptoms later. If your medical condition is interfering with your ability to live a normal, healthy life, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. It’s possible that you qualify for compensation from the VA.

    If you need help with your disability claim, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Contact us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.