We Provide Answers to Your VA Disability Benefits Questions Here

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  • Can the VA take control of my finances if I have a mental illness?

    It’s possible that a veteran can be found mentally incompetent if he has a mental disability, is of advanced age, or is physically frail or weak. For the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to determine that an individual is incompetent, there must be medical evidence to support this or a court ruling.

    If you’re found to be incompetent and unable to handle your financial affairs, the VA may appoint someone to serve as a VA fiduciary under its Veterans Fiduciary Program. This person is similar to a guardian or representative of someone’s estate.

    Responsibilities of a Fiduciary

    Can the VA take control over a vet's benefits?​It’s important to understand the role of a fiduciary and the limitations of this person’s authority. A fiduciary must use the veteran’s VA benefits for their personal care and/or well-being. The veteran must be provided the same standard of living like any other person with similar finances, and the fiduciary must be sure the veteran receives the appropriate medical and mental health care.

    It’s also important to understand the following limitations of the fiduciary:

    • The individual isn't appointed by the court.
    • They have the authority only over the benefits a veteran receives from the VA. Sometimes, this authority extends to managing all of the veteran’s financial affairs if their VA benefits are combined with other funds.
    • The VA—and not the court—has oversight for this arrangement.

    How the VA Determines Incompetence

    Most often, the VA relies on the results of the veteran’s Compensation and Pension (C&P) Exam to determine if he’s incompetent. The C&P exam is a standard assessment taken after you apply for disability.

    In this report, a doctor provides a medical opinion about your disability and whether it’s service-connected, as well as information about your mental ability to handle money. Additionally, the VA may also look at the results of your regular doctor visits to determine your ability to handle VA benefits. Usually, it’s the C&P examiner who brings up the issue of incompetence—often during an exam where a veteran is looking for an increase in his rating for a mental condition.

    While it’s usually up to the VA rater who reviews the case to make the determination of incompetence, the rater most often agrees with the opinion of the examiner.

    Contact Our Experienced VA Disability Lawyers For A Consultaiton Today

    The experienced VA Disability Lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country. They understand that PTSD or any mental illness is a debilitating condition that can severely and negatively impact a veteran’s life.

    If your C&P exam results indicate mental incompetence, or you’d like a free evaluation of your disability case, call Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys will answer your questions and ensure that you have accurate information about your rights as they relate to your mental health diagnosis. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise on your rights. Contact us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • How does the VA Evaluate My PTSD Using a PLC-5 form?

    If you’re a veteran seeking financial assistance from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for PTSD, you’ll need to fill out a PCL-5 form. It helps assess the existence and severity of PTSD symptoms, and you’ll likely be given it prior to your Compensation and Pension (C&P) exam. There are three versions of this form—the PCL-M is for military personnel—and you’ll answer questions about “stressful military experiences.”

    Filling out a PCL-5 form for PTSD evaluation

    Using the PLC-M for Your Evaluation

    When you arrive for your C&P exam for PTSD, you'll probably be given the PLC-5 (PCL-M) paper exam. This exam is a PTSD checklist that has approximately 20 questions. It’s used as a self-screening tool—or self-reporting tool—to assist in diagnosing PTSD.

    The PCL-5 helps to:

    • Monitor the changes in symptoms during and after a patient is treated
    • Screen patients for PTSD
    • Make a provisional (temporary) diagnosis of PTSD

    The PCL-5 can be completed in about 5–10 minutes and is usually filled out in the waiting room. Veterans are asked to rate certain symptoms over the last month using the following 0–4 scale:

    • 0 = Not at all
    • 1 = A little bit
    • 2 Moderately
    • 3 Quite a bit
    • 4 Extremely

    Using these scores, the C&P examiner can make a “provisional diagnosis” of PTSD. For a veteran to have a probable diagnosis of PTSD, he must have given a "2 or higher rating in each of the four symptoms groups." Also, if the veteran scored 38 or higher after answering all questions, it’s probable that he has PTSD.

    Our Experienced VA Disability Lawyers Can Help You With Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced VA disability lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans made to protect this country. They understand that PTSD is a debilitating mental condition that can severely and negatively impact a veteran’s life.

    If you need help with your upcoming C&P exam or service-connecting your PTSD and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

  • What are the symptoms of hypervigilance?

    Veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after witnessing or being involved in a traumatic incident during service may experience hypervigilance as a symptom of this mental condition. Hypervigilance causes a veteran to feel on “high alert” for dangers or threats they believe are real but often are not. When they have this heightened sense of arousal, a veteran can feel anxiety, have fight or flight responses, and feel they're in jeopardy. 

    Symptoms of Hypervigilance

    When an individual has feelings of hypervigilance, they might experience the following physical, behavioral, emotional, and mental symptoms:

    • Physical. These symptoms most closely resemble anxiety and can include sweating, a rapid heart rate, and shallow, quick breathing. Over an extended period of time, a veteran who remains in this constant state of readiness can be overcome with exhaustion.
    • Behavioral. These symptoms of hypervigilance include quick, automatic, knee-jerk type reactions. A person may have nervous, jittery reflexes and overreact to loud noises. Additionally, they might misperceive a comment from a friend or coworker, believing it was rude or inconsiderate. And because their immediate instinct is to defend themselves, they may respond violently or with hostility.
    • Emotional. Various emotional symptoms of hypervigilance can be extreme and harsh. Veterans often feel fear, panic, and constant worry, as well as concern that they’re being judged by others. Sometimes, they withdraw emotionally, experience mood swings, or have sudden outbursts of emotion that don’t fit the situation.
    • Mental. In general, the “processing protocol” is broken in the brain of someone who suffers from PTSD. Paranoia is a primary mental symptom of hypervigilance, along with excessive rationalizations of actions that aren’t logical or reasonable.

    Symptoms of hypervigilanceThere are long-term symptoms of hypervigilance as well.

    If someone is in a constant state of “alertness,” they may develop certain behaviors to quiet or oppose what they perceive are threats. If they believe they're in danger of assault, they might decide to carry a concealed weapon. If they suffer from social anxiety, they may use daydreaming to resist participating in conversations.

    Call Cuddigan Law for Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced veterans disability lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country. They understand that combat isn't easy, and veterans can suffer from physical injuries, as well as psychological traumas, including PTSD and the many symptoms that go with it, such as hypervigilance.

    If you’re a veteran suffering from PTSD, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. If you need help service-connecting your mental health condition and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our veterans disability lawyers have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • What do I need to corroborate my stressor event?

    If you’re a veteran who experienced a traumatic event during active duty that caused your post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this “stressor” event must be corroborated if you want disability benefits from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). We explain how you go about this.

    Corroborating an In-Service Stressor

    Corroborating a PTSD service-related stressorThe VA states that a stressor involves being exposed to death or threatened with death, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence. To get a VA disability rating for PTSD, veterans must have: 

    1. A current diagnosis of PTSD by a medical professional
    2. A corroborated in-service stressor
    3. Medical evidence that links the PTSD to the stressor

    If a veteran experienced a stressor that’s not linked with a combat incident for which he was awarded a medal, the VA will require a detailed account of the stressor event. There are various questions an individual will need to answer, but some include:

    • The date the stressor event occurred, within two months
    • The unit designation when the event occurred
    • The names/unit designations of anyone who was killed when the event occurred
    • The facility that treated the wounds suffered in the stressor event
    • The names of others who witnessed the event
    • The types of military equipment damaged or lost in the stressor event

    Answering these questions help the VA corroborate that the event did, in fact, happen. Often, veterans are surprised and offended by the amount and type of information requested by the VA. However, because the stressor event might have occurred years and sometimes decades before the disability claim is filed, the VA needs specific data as it doesn’t have automatic access to every record maintained by the military.

    Call Cuddigan Law for Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced veterans disability lawyers at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans made to protect this country. They understand that some individuals may experience stressors that cause PTSD. If you’re a veteran who needs to corroborate your in-service stressor, we can help. We'll also assist you in obtaining the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones.

    Our veterans disability lawyers have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • Is medical treatment for PTSD and traumatic brain injuries different?

    It should be, and here's why: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition, and a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a neurological disorder. Treatment is sometimes complicated because the symptoms for PTSD and a TBI can be similar. For example, patients who suffer from PTSD or a TBI may share symptoms of irritability and fatigue. But despite the overlap in symptoms, the medical treatment for them should be different.

    Treating a traumatic brain injury and how it's different from PTSDTreatment for a TBI

    If a veteran experiences a mild TBI, he's likely to recover without any type of medical treatment. However, for more severe TBIs, some medication may be prescribed, and treatment usually involves rehabilitation to help the patient improve functioning.

    Because a TBI can impact walking, talking, and thinking, a doctor may prescribe the following types of rehab:

    • Physical therapy (PT). In general, PT helps patients reclaim their ability to move, talk, and function, enabling them to enjoy favorite activities and live normal lives. Treatment usually involves exercise, hot/cold therapy, manual therapy, and education for the patient. The goal is to increase a patient’s strength, coordination, and stamina.
    • Language and speech therapy. When a veteran suffers a TBI, he may experience problems with communication and cognition. It may be challenging for him to articulate the point he wants to make, organize thoughts, or understand new information. It’s also possible that a veteran may find it difficult to chew or swallow. Speech therapy helps a patient to express and understand language.​
    • Occupational Therapy. This therapy helps patients regain skills to reach their goals and perform normal, daily activities. Whether someone has cognitive disabilities or is recovering from an injury, an occupational therapist works to treat the whole person so he can engage fully in day-to-day life.

    Treatment for PTSD

    When veterans return home from combat zones where they faced the mental and emotional challenges of war, including life-changing and traumatic events, they can suffer from or later develop PTSD. This recognized medical condition presents symptoms that interfere with a veteran’s ability to live a healthy, productive, and rewarding life. There are numerous treatment methods for military personnel who experience symptoms of PTSD, including:

    • Cognitive Processing Therapy. Many individuals who experienced a traumatic event during war return home to feel they live in a dangerous world. Cognitive processing therapy starts by having a person write an “impact statement” and share it with other veterans to discuss what it’s like to live as if they’re still a prisoner of combat. This begins to help the veteran stop seeing the world as an unsafe place.
    • Prolonged Exposure Therapy. This therapy encourages an individual to gradually address the traumatic or life-altering incident and talk about the memories out loud.
    • Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy. This type of therapy practices relaxation, and also has an individual recall details, re-frame his thoughts about the traumatic event, write a letter about the event, and then conduct a goodbye ceremony to leave the event in the past.

    We Can Help With Your TBI or PTSD Claim

    The experienced veterans disability attorneys at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices all military personnel make to protect this country. We understand that many veterans return home suffering from a medical condition, including PTSD or a TBI, or may develop symptoms later. If your medical condition is interfering with your ability to live a normal, healthy life, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. It’s possible that you qualify for financial assistance from the VA.

    If you need help with your disability claim, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Contact us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • Is it ever too late to get treated for PTSD?

    No matter when symptoms develop or if you’ve had them for a long time, it’s never too late to seek treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This mental illness can occur in veterans just returning from deployment, or symptoms might develop many years later.

    Members of the military who witnessed or were involved in life-threatening, traumatic incidents can suffer from this medical condition at any point. Due to the extreme and dangerous environments they work in, military personnel have a higher risk of developing PTSD than civilians.

    Why Seek Treatment for PTSD?

    Seeking treatment for PTSD might not feel like an easy decision for many veterans. People with a mental illness often want to avoid discussing it with others and turn inward as a way of coping with this condition. However, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recognizes PTSD as a medical condition, and the agency offers various programs and resources that provide excellent treatment options that can be very helpful.

    Never too late to get PTSD treatmentIt’s important to seek treatment, because PTSD can interfere with your relationships, your success at work, your daily routine, and your satisfaction of life.

    While people improve in various ways and through different means, it’s possible for veterans and active servicemen and women suffering with PTSD to better their quality of life. 


    Through treatment, many veterans can eliminate their symptoms; and for others, they learn more effective coping skills that ease troublesome issues.

    Treatment can be a path to:

    • Understanding the trauma you’ve experienced
    • Reconnecting with friends and loved ones
    • Establishing new goals or rekindling old ones
    • Learning skills and strategies that help you manage negative feelings and behaviors associated with the traumatic incident

    Contact Cuddigan Law for Help

    The experienced legal team at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country, and we believe it's never too late to seek treatment if you suffer from PTSD. If you’re a veteran with this medical condition, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. It’s possible that you qualify for financial assistance from the VA.

    If you need help service-connecting your mental health condition and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have been supporting veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • Am I weak because I’ve developed PTSD?

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can develop in servicemen and women on active duty or after they return home, but many are reluctant to seek treatment for this medical condition. Social stigmas or feelings of personal weakness can sometimes cause veterans to suffer in silence while PTSD disrupts their lives.

    You're not weak having PTSDFactors for Developing PTSD

    There are many factors that determine if a member of the military will develop PTSD.

    Even if someone experienced or witnessed a traumatic event, it doesn’t mean he’ll suffer from PTSD. Individuals with the following are more likely to develop this medical condition:

    • Veterans/soldiers with a history of mental illness
    • Veterans/soldiers with a family history of mental illness
    • Veterans/soldiers who have no social support
    • Veterans/soldiers who don’t tell anyone about their traumatic combat experience

    There are many myths about PTSD, but one in particular seems to hamper a veteran’s willingness to get help: having PTSD makes him weak, and he wasn’t strong enough to deal with combat.

    Developing PTSD Doesn’t Make a Veteran Weak

    After experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event, veterans and soldiers may feel embarrassed if they develop symptoms of PTSD. Because there's still a social stigma about people with mental illness, some military personnel may feel damaged, inadequate, or weak, thinking others don’t want to be around them. When this happens, individuals with PTSD tend to keep their pain and suffering to themselves, not letting others in to help.

    Those in the military who have symptoms of PTSD may fear they’ll be seen as unfit for duty by their peers and superiors. They also may be afraid they’ll be discharged. Because there still might be a misconception that a service member with PTSD isn’t able to protect others and can’t be trusted, military personnel often keep silent about their condition.

    It’s important to know that developing PTSD isn’t anyone’s fault. To demonstrate real courage, it’s critical for your health to speak up and get help. Because there are many options and resources available for treatment, there’s every reason to get the assistance you need to cope with this medical condition. 

    Cuddigan Law Can Help With Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced legal team at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country, and we understand that developing PTSD isn't a weakness. If you’re a veteran suffering from PTSD, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. It’s possible that you qualify for financial assistance from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

    If you need help service-connecting your mental health condition and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have been supporting veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • How Does a Doctor Diagnose PTSD?

    Many veterans returning home from military service experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These men and women have witnessed or been involved in life-altering, traumatic events that created serious physical and emotional challenges. PTSD is a recognized medical condition, and veterans have higher risks of developing PTSD than individuals who don’t serve in the military.

    When doctors diagnose PTSD, they perform:

    • A physical exam to make certain medical problems aren't causing the symptoms.
    • A psychological evaluation that involves discussing all of the signs and symptoms experienced up to and after the event. For this determination, the doctor uses criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association.

    What Are the DSM-5 Requirements?

    How PTSD is diagnosedPTSD is now included as a new category in the DSM-5: Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders. Every condition requires a veteran be exposed to a traumatic or stressful event. Here's a short summary of the criteria used for diagnosing PTSD:

    Requirement 1: Stressor (must have one)

    A veteran must have experienced death, a death threat, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence in one (or more) of the following ways:

    • He had direct exposure to the event
    • He witnessed the traumatic event
    • He learned that a close friend or a relative was exposed to the traumatic event
    • He had indirect exposure to graphic details about the traumatic event—for example, EMT workers and first responders

    Requirement 2: Intrusion Symptoms (must have one)

    The veteran must consistently re-experience the traumatic event in one or more of the following ways:

    • He has nightmares
    • He has flashbacks
    • He has difficult, upsetting, unwanted memories
    • He feels emotional distress after experiencing reminders of the traumatic event
    • He has “physical reactivity” after experiencing reminders of the traumatic event

    Requirement 3: Avoidance (must have one)

    The veteran must show behaviors that avoid “trauma-related stimuli” by:

    • Avoiding trauma-related thoughts and/or feelings
    • Avoiding trauma-related external reminders such as activities, social events, environments, and people who might bring about memories of the event

    Requirement 4: Negative Alterations in Cognition and Mood (must have two)

    The veteran’s negative feelings and thoughts worsened after the traumatic event by:

    • Inability to remember important features of the incident
    • Excessively negative assumptions and thoughts about self and the world
    • Excessive blame of others or self for causing the traumatic event
    • Decreased interest in day-to-day activities or pursuits once enjoyed
    • Increased feelings of isolation
    • Inability to experience a positive outlook

    There are additional criteria that include irritability, aggression, destructive behavior, hyper-vigilance, and difficulty concentrating or sleeping. If symptoms last for more than a month, create functional impairment or distress, and aren’t due to medication use, substance abuse, or other illnesses, your doctor may diagnose you with PTSD.

    Cuddigan Law Can Help With Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced legal team at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans have made to protect this country. If you’re a veteran suffering from PTSD, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. It’s possible that you qualify for financial assistance from the VA.

    If you need help service-connecting your mental health condition and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • Why am I experiencing PTSD so long after my military service?

    While post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can affect service personnel when they return from deployment, many veterans experience symptoms of PTSD much later in life—long after their time in the military. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals show a growing number of senior veterans seeking treatment for new PTSD symptoms.

    Reasons Veterans Experience PTSD Later in Life

    Why some PTSD symptoms appear for older veteransWhen veterans return home from military duty, many find jobs, get married, have children, and continue on with their lives. Despite experiencing traumatic, life-altering incidents during combat, they're able to function in society, have families, and socialize with their friends in a productive way.


    However, when some veterans get older, as is the case with civilians, they are faced with major life changes that can be triggers for PTSD and its accompanying symptoms.

    For example, a veteran may eventually suffer a significant medical issue after years of good health. The concern and distress he feels about his condition may cause him to become more aware of his own mortality and the end of his life. This type of anxiety may bring about symptoms of PTSD.

    Additionally, a veteran may experience PTSD later in life because of:

    • Repressed feelings. For many Vietnam veterans, it was difficult to talk about their experiences because there was so much hostility and negativity about the war. In many cases, society viewed these veterans as the enemy—thus, veterans repressed feelings they had about their time in combat, creating psychological issues that surfaced later. Additionally, many veterans who served during the Vietnam era were told to “man up” about anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues. Ultimately, those emotions emerged later through PTSD symptoms.
    • More leisure time. After veterans retire, they have more time to consider the past and reflect on the events experienced during combat. Feelings they might have held back or suppressed over the years may emerge in a way that haunts them or causes them to relive a traumatic event. Employment is no longer a major part of their days, and without that as a distraction, their minds might wander into the past, often prompting flashbacks of difficult times.
    • Death of loved ones. As veterans get older, they face the death of friends, family members, siblings, romantic partners, and even comrades they had during their time in service. If death happens more frequently, it can trigger thoughts and emotions of survivor guilt, remorse, regret, and loss for all that transpired in the past.

    Cuddigan Law Can Help With Your PTSD Claim

    The experienced legal team at Cuddigan Law recognizes and respects the sacrifices veterans made to protect this country. If you’re a veteran suffering from PTSD, we can help you obtain the disability benefits you need to care for yourself and your loved ones. It’s possible that you qualify for financial assistance from the VA.

    If you need help service-connecting your mental health condition and want to file for disability benefits, contact Cuddigan Law. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.

     

  • Are there alternative treatment options for my PTSD?

    For many years, veterans and civilians who have post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, were treated with prolonged exposure therapy, cognitive processing therapy, and pharmacological therapy. These approaches have helped veterans, in particular, deal with the emotional aftermath of military combat and the life-changing, traumatic events that bring on this mental condition.

    However, researchers, doctors, and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) agree there's no “one size fits all” therapy, and they're recognizing the benefits of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) techniques for helping veterans deal with PTSD symptoms.

    What Is CAM?

    Alternative treatments for PTSD

    CAM techniques are non-traditional therapies that use medical products and practices that are not considered “standard” care by the medical field. Typically, CAM techniques are used along with other standard treatments. Some CAM techniques have been carefully evaluated and found to be effective and safe, while others are just the opposite.

    Techniques considered part of the CAM therapies include:

    • Traditional alternative medicine. Homeopathy, acupuncture, and naturopathy are therapies that tend to be more accepted and considered mainstream treatments.
    • Diet and herbs. These dietary and herbal approaches work to “balance the body’s nutritional well-being.” Changes in nutrition, along with dietary supplements and herbal medicine, may help with PTSD.
    • Movement therapy. Healing by touch works from the idea that any type of injury or illness can impact the entire body. If optimum health can be achieved in other parts of the body through manual manipulation, it’s thought that the body can target healing at the injury site. Body therapies include massage, tai chi, yoga, and chiropractic medicine.

    Contact Cuddigan Law About Your PTSD Claim

    If you’re a veteran diagnosed with PTSD and you want to file a disability claim or appeal one, contact Cuddigan Law. We'll handle the necessary communication with the VA and work with your doctors to help provide the critical evidence required to prove your claim.

    Additionally, we’ll help service-connect your mental health condition. Our attorneys have supported veterans for years, and we’ll carefully examine your case and advise you on the best approach for receiving the maximum in disability benefits. Call us today, and you’ll speak to an intake specialist for free.