My adult son has autism and is unable to work full-time. Although my son has never worked, I was told that he can apply for SSDI benefits as a disabled adult child. What does the Social Security Administration’s mean by disabled adult child?

If your child is over 18 and unable to live independently or support himself because of a disability, you may have financial concerns. You may worry about meeting your child’s expenses during retirement.  You may worry about the care of your child if something should happen to you.

Social Security Administration (SSA) allows some disabled adults to apply for Social Security disability benefits (SSDI) based on a parent’s earning record. To qualify as a disabled adult child, an applicant must meet all of the following criteria:

  • The applicant is over the age of 18.
  • The applicant is unmarried.
  • The applicant has a qualifying disability.
  • The applicant became disabled before age 22.
  • The applicant either has a parent who receives Social Security benefits (SSI or SSDI) for age or disability, or has a deceased parent that was receiving Social Security benefits at the time of death.

If your child has a qualifying disability and meets the definition of a disabled adult child, he will be eligible to receive monthly SSDI payments.

A qualifying disability is a condition or impairment that meets all of the following criteria:

  • The disability began before age 22.
  • The disability has lasted at least 12 months, or is expected to last for at least 12 months, or result in death.
  • The disability prevents the applicant from performing substantial work for pay.
  • The disability meets all the criteria for of a condition that is included in Social Security Administration’s Blue Book list of impairments or is equivalent in severity to a listed impairment or is unable to perform any work based his limitations

A child who qualifies for SSDI as a disabled adult child may receive benefits as long as he is unmarried. The benefits will be terminated if the child marries, but an exception may be made if a disabled adult child marries another disabled adult child.

Not sure if your child qualifies as a disabled adult child? He may be eligible for SSI or other benefits. Our Omaha disability attorneys can help you find the best option for your family. We’ll even help you through the application process.For a free case evaluation, contact the Nebraska Social Security lawyers at Cuddigan Law at 402-933-5405.