What type of medical evidence is needed by Social Security to prove that i have a blood disorder?

Testing Needed to Prove Blood Disorders to the SSAIn certain cases, hematological diseases, such as anemias and clotting disorders, can be covered under Social Security disability. However, you first have to prove to the Social Security Administration (SSA) that you have been diagnosed with the disorder you claim.

The SSA requires one of the following pieces of evidence as medical proof of a blood disorder:

  • A laboratory report of definitive test results clearly establishing a hematological disorder that has been signed by a physician.
  • A laboratory report of test results that clearly establish a hematological disorder that is not signed by a physician, plus a signed statement from a physician that confirms you have the disorder.
  • A report from a physician that attests to the positive diagnosis of your hematological disorder, including confirmation that you have had a definitive laboratory test to diagnose your disorder and a summary of that test’s results. This is typically only acceptable if laboratory tests and reports are unavailable.

Once your diagnosis is established, the SSA will consider the relevant medical data in your case to determine how much your hematological disorder impacts your daily life and your ability to earn a living. They will examine your symptoms, how often your condition causes complications, and the impact of your treatments. Because this information will determine your ability to function effectively and independently in a work environment, it is vital to supply as much relevant medical evidence about your condition as possible.

Social Security Does Not Pay for Your Diagnostic Tests

It is important to note that the SSA does not pay for your lab tests, and many of these diagnostic tests (such as bone marrow aspirations or clotting-factor protein tests) can be expensive. So, it is best to seek the advice of your  doctor to see whether a test is medically necessary and a disability attorney to determine if further testing will benefit your case. Call us at (402) 933-5405 or click the contact link on this page to ask us a question, or learn more in our free guide, 5 Deadly Mistakes That Can Destroy Your Social Security Disability Case.

 

Sean D. Cuddigan
SSA and VA Disability Attorney in Omaha, Nebraska